RAFT

R.A.F.T.  -    The What, the Why, and the How

When to use this strategy? Any point in the lesson

Targeted Reading Outcomes: 
Understand the relationship between literature and its historical, social, and cultural contexts
Analyze and interpret elements of character development

What is it? 
This is a great strategy that integrates reading and writing in a non-traditional way.  It asks that students take what they have read or learned and create a new product that illustrates their depth of understanding. The format is incredibly flexible and offers limitless opportunities for creativity for both you and your students.  When you are first using a “RAFT” with your students, you will develop the specifics for each element in the acronym; they are as follows:
  • Role: In developing the final product, what role will the students need to “take on”?   Writer?  Character (in the novel)?  Artist?  Politician?  Scientist? 
  • Audience: Who should the students consider as the audience for the product?  Other students?  Parents?  Local community?  School board?  Other characters in the text?
  • Format: What is the best product that will demonstrate the students’ in-depth understanding of their interactions with the text?  A writing task?  Art work?  Action plan?  Project? 
  • Topic: This is the when, who, or what that will be the focus/subject of the final product. Will it take place in the same time period as the novel?  Who will be the main focus of the product?  What event will constitute the centerpiece of the action?
What does it look like?
A teacher assigns (or students select) a role, audience, format, and topic from a range of possibilities.  Below is a chart with a few examples in each of the categories; it is meant only as a sampling to spark new ideas and possibilities for building RAFTS: 
 

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Matt Pariseau,
Feb 5, 2015, 8:32 PM
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Matt Pariseau,
Feb 5, 2015, 8:33 PM
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Matt Pariseau,
Feb 5, 2015, 8:33 PM
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